Engr 301 Assignment Of Mortgage

CVEN 322 - Section 501
CIVIL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
Course Syllabus - Fall 2015c (CRN 16956)
MWF 3:00 pm to 3:50 pm - CE 219

  Help for CVEN 322 is available from the people shown below, at the office hours listed only.
PLEASE NOTE: The homework problems and assignments are under constant revision during the semester. Please check the syllabus frequently for changes. 

Professor: Lee L. Lowery, Jr., PhD, P.E.

Office: Old CE Building, Room 139C
Phone: 845-4395 (Office), 775-5401 (Home)
e-mail: Lowery@tamu.edu
Office Hours

NOTE: Office hours listed below are suspended on the day before a major exam, giving me time to make it out.  Do not wait until the day before a major exam for help, unless the tutor has office hours on that day.

Half of my time is spent teaching CVEN 446, CVEN 322, and ENGR 485. During the remaining hours I am a departmental adviser and have limited time for tutoring. Please plan on assistance either during my office hours, or see the TA during their office hours. Please note that you won't find me available at other than the hours listed above.  Don't wait until just before class to get help or you likely won't get any.

 

The following graduate student is employed to help you with grading and CVEN 322 questions.  Please see them during their office hours listed below.

Teaching Associate: nabha

    Tutoring: CVLB Building - Room 301-D
    Hours: Tuesday 2:30 - 4:40 pm
                Wednesday 4:00 - 5:30 pm
                Thursday 9:00 - 11:00 am
   Email:  
   Phone:
Grader:

 Our Textbook

First Edition:

  Or Second Edition:

Textbook:

The textbook is excellent, but over the years we have developed class notes which might enable you to do without a book. At over $100, I am willing to try anything. Only the economics part of this course requires some kind of a formal text, and any old used engineering economics textbook will work fine in my section. The text for this class, should you choose to buy it is: Civil and Environmental Systems Engineering, by Charles S. Revelle, Earl Whitlach, and Jeff Wright; Prentice-Hall.  Either the first or second edition will work fine.  The 1st edition is what I use. I understand that using two editions causes some confusion, but being able to use an inexpensive previous edition which has the needed content is worth it.

Looking for a used textbook?  ORDER EARLY!  Here is where a text I bought has been.  Around the world in 30 days.

Bookstore or Internet?

Catalog Description:

Civil Engineering Systems (3-0) Credit 3. I, II, S. Application of systems analysis to civil engineering design, systems synthesis and optimization techniques. Economic analysis and evaluation of engineering projects. Assignments apply engineering economics, statistical theory and optimization techniques to civil engineering problems.

Course Objectives:

  • To introduce the student to the principles of engineering economics and economic evaluation techniques.
  • To introduce the student to engineering optimization models, including Excel, EES, and Linear Programming, which are useful in engineering applications.
  • To introduce the student to engineering system simulation methods using computer aided block oriented system simulation.
  • To demonstrate how system simulation, optimization techniques, and engineering economics are used for decision support in civil engineering applications.

Learning Outcomes

  • (a) Ability to apply knowledge of basic mathematics, science, and engineering.
  • (b) Ability to analyze and interpret data.
  • (c) Ability to design a civil and/or ocean engineering system to meet desired needs.
  • (e) Ability to formulate and solve civil and/or ocean engineering problems.
  • (l) Ability to use computers to solve civil and/or ocean engineering problems.
  • (m) Ability to apply probability, simulation, and economics to civil/ocean engineering decisions.

Course Prerequisites:

To take CVEN 322, you MUST be enrolled in or have received a passing grade (no D's, F's or I's) in STAT 211 (statistics) and CVEN 302, or equivalent courses.

Course Assessment:

  • Graded major exams (Quiz A, Quiz B, Final Exam = 3 @ 30% each)
  • Graded homework assignments and Readiness Assessment Tests (RATs, or Pop Quizzes) = 10%
  • Deductions in final grade may be made as specified in Gradingbelow.
  • All homework and quizzes will be graded using Beason’s Qualitative Grading Rubric. 

Resources available to the student:

  • Instructor of record: Dr. Lee L. Lowery, Jr.
  • Teaching associate listed above
  • CE 322 Files and Grades<---- CLICK HERE FIRST
  • List of homework problems and pop quizzes assigned during the semester.
  • On-line video web-based assistance - Streaming video review modules are listed in red in the syllabus below
  • Computer software (Excel, EES, MOR, LP, BOSS)
  • EES (Engineering Equation Solver)  What it is, how to get it, video example on using it, user's manual, short tutorial 
  • Computers in the Civil Engineering Computer Labs
  • Old 322 exams, including this semester's, after the exams are returned
  • Chances of making what grade in Lowery's 322 class after Quiz A, and after Quiz B
  • This semester's Lectures and Notes (2015 Fall) (will be put on  the web after each class. Please email me if I forget to add them within a couple of days.   Please note: Use of videos.
  • Last semester's Lectures and Notes(2014 Fall)
  • Make-up exams
  • Access to the Civil Engineering Apps Server
  • Q-Drop deadline information and here
  • A few of the first homework problems for those awaiting their books. These are from the 1st edition. 
  • Student Use of the Homework Solution Manual at my office or the Tutor's
  • HELP DESK HOURS - FALL 2017  Lobby of DLEB (former CE/TTI building where PR^2 was located, next to the PETE Building).  Has sign on desk: Help Desk CVEN Mechanics or something to that effect.
  • Typical point deductions you can expect on exams and pop quizzes
  • Seating chart
  • Video examples/Flipped classes - Civil Engineering systems problems
  • DOSBOX

A note on Online video help modules

The correct time (to the nanosecond)

PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING SYLLABUS INFORMATION:


Each day before you come to class you should look on the list below to see what will be covered that day and bring a copy of it to class with you. Please don't come to class without a copy of things that say "Print out the following page ."  Please take this course requirement seriously.

Topics Covered: 

Date

Class No.

Material in this column will be covered from the Revelle text, and other sources. Page numbers in "< >" refer to Revelle 1st edition.
Page numbers in "{ }" refer to the 2nd edition.
 See comments at bottom.

NOTE! Learning objectives for each day are listed on the pages below.

Note: Print out the material for each day listed below and bring it to class with you.

Homework Problems, Assignments, and Hints

Each problem listed in a set is worth 10 points per problem, unless otherwise noted. 

Note that the homework problems which are listed in carets "<  >" are from the 1st Edition of Revelle, and those listed within braces "{  }" are from the 2nd Edition.

Problem hints, if any, and any other relevant information are hyperlinked. For students awaiting a book ordered over the web, a copy of these problems can be found at eCampus in the 322 files.

All homework problems are to be handed in one week from the day assigned as a hard copy unless otherwise stated in the problem assignment.

Week 1Mon
8/31

1

Introduction to 322
[Engineering Economics]
Introduction, transferring money in time, interest, cash flow tables and cash flow diagrams, early payoffs.
Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <346-351>{377-382}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Help on interest

Click here to begin course

Next: Read all hyperlinked syllabus material at the top of this page.

 Hints on homework problems are hyperlinked on the problems below.
 
3 homework problems from the textbook:

Assignment 1
Either this <1st edition>: <Chap 13.1, 2, 5>
or this {2nd edition}:{Chap 14.1, 2, 5},
depending on which edition of the text you are using.

HELP VIDEO ON <13.2>{14.2}
MP4

Due one week from today

Wed
9/2

2

[Engineering Economics]
Investment, rule of 72, equivalence, sub-compounding, continuous compounding, use of standard economics equations.
Derive F = A(F/A , i , n), others.
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

2 homework problem from the text:

Assignment 2
<Chap 13.6, 9(3% rate only)>
or {Chap 14.6, 9(3% rate only)}

Due one week from today

Fri
9/4

3

[Engineering Economics]
Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <351-355>{382-388}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

2 homework problem from the text:

Assignment 3
<Chap 13.11, 14>
or {Chap 14.11, 14}

Due one week from today

Week 2Mon
9/74

[Engineering Economics]
Arithmetic gradient cash flows, geometric gradient cash flows, capitalized costs, nominal vs. true interest rates, finding unknown interest rate (internal rate of return), finding unknown number of compounding periods.

Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <356-361>{387-392}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 4
<Chap 13.15, 18>
or {Chap 14.15, 18}

Wed
9/9

5

[Engineering Economics]
Project comparisons, maximization of net benefits
*Revelle Pages <367-378>{403-413}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 5
Due on Class 10
<Chap 13.20, 23>
or {Chap 14.20, 23}

Fri
9/11

6

[Engineering Economics]
Equivalent time of projects, annual cash flow comparisons.
Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <367-378>{403-413}

Assignment 6
Due on Class 11
<Chap 14.2, 4>
or {Chap 15.2, 4}
Due 1 week from today

Week 3Mon
9/14

7

[Engineering Economics]
Minimum attractive rate of return, internal rate of return, payback period, break-even analysis.
Online video help:Economics

*Revelle Pages <379-387>{414-423}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 7
Due on Class 12
<Chap 14.6(a,b,c only), 8(a,b only)>
or {Click here for comment on Chap 15.6(a,b,c only), 8(a,b only)}Wed
9/168 [Engineering Economics]
Straight line depreciation, declining balance.
Online video help:
Economics
*Revelle Pages <393-398>{433-438}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problemsAssignment 8
Due on Class 13
<Chap 14.10>
or {Chap 15.10}Fri
9/189 [Engineering Economics]
When depreciation is allowed.
Online video help:
Economics
*Revelle Pages <393-398>{433-438}
Pure 200% double declining balance notesAssignment 9
Due on Class 14
<Chap 14.12>
or {Chap 15.12}

  Week 4Mon
9/21

10

[Engineering Economics]
MACRS depreciation, changing from MACRS to straight line, corporate and personal taxes, effects of inflation.
Excel program for MACRS depreciation
Excel program for tax benefits of depreciation
Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <399-420>{440-464}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 10
Due on Class 15
<Chap 15.1, 2, 3, 5, 6>
or {Chap 16.1, 2, 3, 5, 6}Wed
9/23

11

[Engineering Economics]
Mortgages, amount required to pay a loan off early, interest paid.
Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <421-436>{465-481}
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 11
Due on Class 16
<Chap 15.8, 16, 19>
or {Chap 16.8, 16(a, b only), 19}Fri
9/25

12

[Engineering Economics]
Interest saved under various conditions, bonds.
Online video help:Economics
*Revelle Pages <421-436>{465-481}

Assignment 12
Due on Class 17
<Chap 15.29, 30>
or {Chap 16.29, 30}

  Week 5Mon
9/2813

[Engineering System Optimization]
Use of Spreadsheets & EES
How to get EES
EES User's Manual
Excel bolted plate example
EES bolted plate example
EES manhole example
How to download: EES & EES Tutorial 
Online video help:Use of EES
Online video help: Solution to roof pump using EES
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Learning to use EES

Assignment 13
Due on Class 18
Web Problem 4.1) Roof Pump problem to be solved using EES

RESUME
In the past, we used to require you to write a resume and post it on the web, because it was new and you didn't know how.  That's no longer the case so we no longer require it.  However, if you would like, you can post your resume at

http://civilgrads.tamu.edu

See instructions at http://tx.ag/CEResume

Wed
9/30

14

[Engineering System Optimization]
Use of EES to solve roof pump problem.

Online video help:
Solution to roof pump using Excel (brute force) & Excel Solver Add-in

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

**SEE FOOTNOTE BELOW
Revelle pages <1-14> Learning to use advanced
features of Excel

Assignment 14
Due on Class 19
Web Problem 4.2: Roof Pump problem to be solved using Excel.  Notes on problem.

Comments on hand calculations, accuracy, etc.Fri
10/2

15

[Engineering System Optimization]
Use of Excel to solve roof pump problem.

Online help:
Excel Tutorial (Read if you need help) Learning to use advanced
features of Excel

Assignment 15
Due on Class 20
Web Problem 4.3: Modified Roof Pump problem to be solved using Excel.
  Week 6Mon
10/5

16

[Engineering System Optimization]
Use of EES and Excel to solve footing problem.  Optimization of engineering problems using Linear Programming.  Use of the MOR Program.  Binary and integer vs. floating point numeric solutions.

Please print out the following 4 sections and bring them to class with you:.  I will ask you to put your name on one of them and hand it in at the end of class as a pop quiz.

  1. How to solve linear programming problems

    One sheet summary

  2. Differences between L.P. and normal equations

  3. Water distribution problem

  4. Solving L.P. problems by plotting

Excel Linear Programming Template
Excel River/Well water problem on Template

Computer programs:

How to download and run MOR.
Read: MOR User's Manual

Online video help:

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <15-30>

Learning to use MOR

Assignment 16
Due on Class 21
Web Problem 4.4: Spread Footing problem to be solved using EES

 

Wed
10/717 [Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming
Graphical solutions
Integer solutions
Cut and fill problem,

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <31-45>Assignment 17
Due on Class 22
Web Problem 4.5: Spread Footing problem to be solved using Excel.
 Fri
10/918 [Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Time independent production model I
Time independent production model II

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <31-45>Solve using MOR:
Assignment 18
Due on Class 23
Web Problem: 5.0 (water distribution),
Web Problem: 5.1 (balanced haul)
  Week 7Mon
10/12

19

[Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming
 Waste disposal for large combined area.
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <46-60> Web Problems:
Assignment 19
Due on class 24
5.2 (waste transport)
5.3 (% gravel hauling)
5.4(dirt haul)
  Wed
10/14 20

[Engineering System Optimization]
Balanced vs. unbalanced transportation/supply & demand problems

Balanced supplies and demands

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <60-70>

Web Problems:
Assignment 20
Due on Class 25
5.5(apartments)
5.6(concrete haul)
5.10 (balanced shipping)
 

Fri
10/16 21

[Engineering System Optimization]
Balanced vs. unbalanced transportation/supply & demand problems

Unbalanced supplies and demands, assignments

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <60-70>

Web Problems:
Assignment 21
Due on Class 26
5.13 (gravel for road)
5.14 (graphic solution)
5.16 (regional wastewater plants)

Week 8Mon
10/19

22

Quiz A - Covers Engineering Economics, EES, & Excel Spreadsheets, through Class #16.  Linear programming is not covered on Quiz A. Exam A will be held today during regular class hours, in our regular classroom. The only material allowed in the exam is the F.E. Exam Reference Manual
(click here for a copy.)

Bring a copy with you to the exam unless you have memorized the interest rate tables, and all equations.

If you need material that is not in the reference manual, I will give it to you on the exam. Reference Manuals will be available for lease from the professor during the exam, at a cost of $1 per minute.

Your homework assigned earlier is still due today.  However I don't want to delay the quiz, so you can hand it in with your next homework set.  That doesn't mean it isn't due, only that you are going to hand in two sets next class.Wed
10/21 23

[Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Print out a copy of each of the following problems:
Subcontractor Bids

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <71-80>

Web Problems:
 Assignment 22
Due on Class 27
5.11 (regional refuse haul)
5.17 (lay binding with paver)Fri
10/23 24

[Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Print out a copy of each of the following problems:
Traffic Networks
 

Web Problems:
Assignment 23
Due on Class 28
5.21 (rapid transport system)
5.33 (assign machines)
  Week 9Mon
10/2625 [Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <81-95> Web Problems:
Assignment 24
Due on Class 29
5.18 (make paper)
5.62 (power line)Wed
10/2826 [Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Time dependent production models

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <129-136> Web Problems:
Due on Class 30
5.63 (Skycon)Fri
10/3027 [Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Bus driver allocation Web Problems:
Assignment 26
Due on Class 30
5.65 (bus shift times) Week 10Mon
11/2 28

[Engineering System Optimization]
Linear Programming

Open pit mining
Ambulance siting
Siteing hamburger shoppes

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems
**Revelle pages <137-147>

Web Problems:
Assignment 27
Due on Class 31
5.64 (contractor)
5.72 (unbalanced supplies)
 Wed
11/4
29

Quiz B - Covers Engineering System Optimization (linear programming) and Engineering Economics, through Class #26, with some emphasis on Linear Programming.  All LP problem types covered in class are on the quiz.   Engineering Simulation is not covered.

Exam B will be held during regular class hours in our classroom. The only material allowed in the exam is the F.E. exam reference manual on Economics (click here for a copy). Bring a copy with you to the exam unless you have memorized the interest rate tables, and all equations.

Your homework assigned earlier is still due today.  However I don't want to delay the quiz, so you can hand it in with your next homework set.  That doesn't mean it isn't due, only that you are going to hand in two sets next class.


Fri
11/6 30

[Engineering System Simulation]
Simulation of engineering systems
Click here for NSF's Opinion on Simulation

How to compute interarrival times - Uniform, Normal, Exponential Distributions, Z tables, Record the time you come into class, Summary of how to compute interarrival times.

Excel calculator for interarrival times

 Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 28
5.8 (where supply < demand)
Web Problem 6.0: 
Determine interarrival times.
Due on Class 33 Week 11Mon
11/9 31

[Engineering System Simulation]
Simulation of engineering systems

 How dynamic systems are simulated.

Simulation hand solution form.

Assignment 29
Web Problem 6.1:
Trucking simulation by hand, using
Due on Class 34Wed
11/11 32

[Engineering System Simulation]
Introduction to simulation of engineering systems using Block Oriented System Simulation, (BOSS***)

NOTE: The best book on earth on simulation is available here.
Use of the MOR/DS program, Discuss economic impact from using 1 truck, 2 trucks, 100 trucks.
Pop Quiz
Hand solution simulation form.
Hauling dirt simulation by hand,
Solution to problem

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 30
Economics Web Problem 6.11:
Holtzapple
Due on Class 35Fri
11/13
NOTE: Last day for dropping class, 33 [Engineering System Simulation]

Short list of BOSS commands (READ!)

Full set of BOSS commands (READ!)

BOSS help file

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problemsAssignment 31
Web Problem 6.10:
Practice with interarrival time distributions
Due on Class 36 Week 12Mon
11/16 34 [Engineering System Simulation]

More typical BOSS commands (READ AGAIN!)
 Assignment 32
Solve using MOR/BOSS:
Web Problem 6.3:
Dirt hauling simulation I
All homework from now on due 7 days hence. Wed
11/18 35 [Engineering System Simulation]
Simulation of hauling dirt using BOSS - 2 trucks of same size
Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 33
Solve using MOR/BOSS:
Web Problem 6.4:
MacDondald's hamburger simulation
 

Fri
11/20

36 [Engineering System Simulation]
Simulation of hauling dirt using BOSS - Multiple trucks of various size

How to do in Simulink what we do in 10 lines of code in BOSS. Assignment 34
Solve using MOR/BOSS:
Web Problem 6.5:
Classroom simulation
Week 13 Mon
11/23 37[Engineering System Simulation]
Show how to interpret BOSS output. Why it is necessary to run each case several times
Zero time loops, and other illegal statements.
Hauling dirt using BOSS - 2 trucks of different sizes

Burgers

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems

Assignment 35
Solve using MOR/BOSS:
Web Problem 6.6:
Dirt hauling simulation II

Wed
11/25   No Class - Reading Day Fri
11/27   Thanksgiving  Week 14 Mon
11/30 38 [Engineering System Simulation]

City intersection figure
City intersection study

Learning objectives, topics covered, example problemsAssignment 36
Web Problem 6.7:
Tanker/tank farm simulationWed
12/2 39

[Engineering System Simulation]

Intercoastal canal waterway study


Learning objectives, topics covered, example problems


Assignment 37
Web Problem 6.8:
Dredging simulation

Homework: Thoroughly understand what we did in class today and be ready to answer similar questions on the final exam.

Pick up any unreturned homework in front of my office door next Monday morning, or later.

Fri
12/4 40 [Engineering System Simulation]

Tanker/tank farm/storm simulation

BOSS exam practice problems
Solutions to BOSS practice problemsAssignment
Homework: Thoroughly understand what we did in class today and be ready to answer similar questions on the final exam.

Pick up any unreturned homework in front of my office door next Monday morning, or later.

    Week 15 Mon
12/7 41 [Engineering System Simulation]
Racing crew simulation

Saving simulation results to disk with histograms and distributionsAssignment
Homework: Thoroughly understand what we did in class today and be ready to answer similar questions on the final exam.

Pick up any unreturned homework in front of my office door next Monday morning, or later.

Wed
12/9 42Thinning of arriving entities
EXITLOGIC (simple example)
EXITLOGIC

BOSS exam practice problems
Solutions to BOSS practice problems

Assignment
Homework: Thoroughly understand what we did in class today and be ready to answer similar questions on the final exam.

Pick up any unreturned homework in front of my office door next Monday morning, or later.

   

Final Exam held in our classroom on Tuesday December 15th, 2015
10:30 am to 12:30 pm.
Covers everything in the course, with emphasis on BOSS (simulation).

CHECK THIS TIME AND DATE FOR ACCURACY AT:

University Final Exam Schedules

The Final Exam covers everything in the course with emphasis on BOSS. You are permitted to bring the following materials only:
Typical BOSS Commands hand-out sheets including the example problems that are printed in that set of notes, and your
FE Engineering Exam Review Manual for Economics.

* Revelle text - this is required reading, either from the Revelle text or from an equivalent text. If you do not have the Revelle text, but have some other engineering economics textbook, that will suffice. Just study the same material as listed in our book, as specified above
** Revelle text - reading materials used to supplement class lectures only. NOT REQUIRED READING.
*** A complete BOSS user's manual is available as a .pdf file by clicking here.

The following is the required ADA statement.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact Disability Services, currently located in the Disability Services building at the Student Services at White Creek complex on west campus or call 979-845-1637. For additional information, visit http://disability.tamu.edu.

 

The following is the required Academic Integrity Statement

 “An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal or tolerate those who do.”

All syllabi shall contain a section that states the Aggie Honor Code and refers the student to the Honor Council Rules and Procedures on the web: http://www.tamu.edu/aggiehonor


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Courses

FIN 300. Introduction to Finance. 3 hours.

Description of financial markets. Time value of money. Risk and return. Market valuation of securities. Capital budgeting, capital structure and dividend policy of firms. Course Information: Recommended background: ACTG 210 and ECON 120.

FIN 301. Introduction to Managerial Finance. 3 hours.

Introduces students to managerial finance: the valuation of future cash flows, capital budgeting, capital structure, and banking. Current events and policy issues are discussed.

FIN 302. Introduction to Investments. 3 hours.

Introduces students to investments: risk/return, models of risk, efficient markets, derivative securities, fixed income securities, international aspects. Current events and policy issues are discussed. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 301.

FIN 310. Investments. 3 hours.

Organization of security markets. Legal and institutional environment, mechanics of trade, financial intermediation, security classification. General principles of asset valuation with application to specific securities. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 311. Introduction to Urban Real Estate. 3 hours.

Introductory survey of urban real estate; business, legal, economic and financial perspectives. Course Information: Same as ECON 311. Previously listed as FIN 371. Prerequisite(s): ECON 120.

FIN 320. Managerial Finance. 3 hours.

Short-term asset management, capital budgeting under certainty and uncertainty, capital structure and dividend policy, valuation and risk, capital asset prices, financial policy for firms. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 330. Quantitative Methods. 3 hours.

Introduces students to the quantitative methods needed for advanced finance coursework: point/interval estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, cross-section analysis, time series analysis, portfolio modeling, advanced topics. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): IDS 270. Recommended background: FIN 300; or FIN 301 & FIN 302.

FIN 340. International Financial Markets. 3 hours.

Evaluation of exchange rate regiments and international financial institutions; develop critical understanding of the asset approach to exchange rates and international financial markets. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 396. Independent Study. 1-3 hours.

Independent study, under the direction of a faculty member, must be arranged before the start of the semester. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor, and the Department Head.

FIN 404. Financial Strategies and Text Analysis. 3 or 4 hours.

Learn the developments made in analyzing textual information. Discuss implications for financial regulations and trading strategies (including high frequency trading). Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302 (undergraduate students). FIN 500 (graduate students). Recommended background: FIN 310 (undergraduate students); FIN 510 (graduate students).

FIN 412. Portfolio Management. 3 hours.

Development of portfolio theory; establishment of portfolio objectives for individuals, corporations, banks, pension and mutual funds; evaluation of portfolio performance. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 310.

FIN 415. Fixed Income Securities. 3 hours.

Valuation of fixed income securities, term structure estimation and arbitrage trading with practical application using real data. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 310.

FIN 416. Options and Futures Markets. 3 hours.

History and institutional structure of options and futures markets. Uses of futures and options for arbitrage, speculation and hedging by managers of domestic and multinational organizations. Analysis of factors which determine futures and options prices. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 310.

FIN 418. Commodities, Energy, and Related Markets. 3 or 4 hours.

Covers markets; physicality; laws and regulations; market participants; fundamentals (ags, metals, petroleum, electricity, emissions, and shipping); spreads; options; and, risk management. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): FIN 310; and FIN 330 or IDS 270 (undergraduate students); FIN 510 (graduate students). Recommended background: IDS 371 (undergraduate students); IDS 570 (graduate students).

FIN 430. Introduction to Money and Banking. 3 hours.

Payment and banking systems; credit and market risk management; The Federal Reserve System; globalization of monetary, banking, and regulatory systems. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 431. Management in the Financial Services Industry. 3 hours.

The principles of management of corporations in the financial services industry, emphasizing commercial bank management and risk. Methodology includes computerized bank management simulation or case studies. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300.

FIN 435. Capitalism, Finance, and American Culture. 3 hours.

Considers how financial theory influences other aspects of American Culture. It will also encourage critical discussion and writing to help students become more effective financial managers. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 442. International Corporate Financial Management. 3 hours.

Financial management within an international context. International monetary system and financial markets, management of foreign investments, working capital management, exchange risks, taxation and earnings reports. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 449. Applied Equity Investment Management. 3 or 4 hours.

Puts financial theory to practice by giving students real life, hands-on experience in managing an equity investment process, from stock selection to portfolio management. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): FIN 310 (undergraduate students); FIN 510 (graduate students). Recommended background: A keen interest/ passion for the markets in general and the equity markets in particular.

FIN 455. Asset Management. 1-4 hours.

Applied course in Investments. The emphasis is on modern quantitative techniques for asset management. Course Information: Students will use real data, and learn to create their own spreadsheet optimization programs in MS excel. Prerequisite(s): FIN 310 (undergraduate students); FIN 510 (graduate students). Recommended Background: Students must be comfortable with linear regressions matrix algebra, basic calculus. Spreadsheet proficiency is essential.

FIN 465. Property and Liability Insurance. 3 or 4 hours.

Using property and liability insurance to manage risk. Topics may include fire, marine, consequential loss, crime, title, automobile, and workers' compensation insurance. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 466. Life and Health Insurance. 3 hours.

Types, uses, and evaluation of life and health insurance. Economics of the industry. Regulation and taxation. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or FIN 301 and FIN 302.

FIN 472. Real Estate Finance. 3 or 4 hours.

Finance principles applied to real estate; financing of residential and income-producing real estate; real estate development finance; secondary mortgage market; taxation and real estate finance. Course Information: Same as ECON 472. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May not be used to satisfy the economics credit requirement for the MA in Economics and Ph.D. in Economics. Elective credit only will be applied toward these degrees. Prerequisite(s): ECON 220.

FIN 473. Introduction to Risk Management. 3 hours.

Introduction to risk management. Loan and credit management; credit scoring. Risk measurements and reserves; banking and insurance capital requirements, the BASEL accord, tail events and catastrophic event insurance. Financial contracts and hedging. Course Information: Same as IDS 473. Prerequisite(s): FIN 300 and IDS 371.

FIN 479. Enterprise Risk Management. 3 or 4 hours.

Overview of enterprise-wide risk management strategies and techniques: strategies that firms employ to enhance value and minimize exposure; techniques used to identify, measure, reduce, and transfer risk. Course Information: Same as IDS 479. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): FIN 300; or consent of the instructor. Recommended background: IDS 473 or FIN 473.

FIN 480. Market Microstructure and Electronic Trading. 3 or 4 hours.

Details of how financial markets work. Market structures; models of price discovery; limit order models; liquidity and price impact; time effects; and, how electronic traders use these ideas to improve trading and research. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): FIN 310; FIN 330 or IDS 270 (undergraduate students); FIN 510 (graduate students). Recommended Background: IDS 371 (undergraduate students); IDS 570 (graduate students).

FIN 494. Special Topics in Finance. 1-4 hours.

An intensive study of a selected topic in finance. Topics vary by sections and by term. Course Information: 1 to 3 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register for more than one section per term. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours for undergraduates; may be repeated to a maximum of 8 hourse for graduate students. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

FIN 495. Competitive Strategy. 4 hours.

Multidisciplinary analysis of organization strategy and policy using case method and/or business simulation. Assignments involve extensive library research as well as oral and written reports. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Senior standing in the College of Business Administration and completion of all other CBA core courses, or consent of the instructor.

FIN 499. Research Experience. 1-3 hours.

Research experience under the supervision of a faculty member. The faculty member and student will determine the research project. Each student must submit a written report and each student must participate at a research event on campus. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor and department head.

FIN 500. Introduction to Corporate Finance. 4 hours.

Theory of corporate finance: goal of the firm, time value of money, investment decisions (under certainty and uncertainty), net present value, capital markets, and corporate financing decisions. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in ACTG 500.

FIN 510. Investments. 4 hours.

Theory and practice of investment analysis. Topics included are the institutional organization of security markets, and fundamental principles of asset valuation with application to specific securities. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500.

FIN 512. Portfolio Analysis. 4 hours.

Development of portfolio theory; establishment of portfolio objectives; evaluation of portfolio performance; investment objectives for individuals, corporations banks, pension and mutual funds, and their interrelation with economic environment. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 510.

FIN 515. Fixed Income Securities. 4 hours.

Valuation of fixed income securities, term structure estimation, financial engineering of fixed income securities, securities lending and valuation of bonds with embedded options. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 510.

FIN 516. Theory and Structure of Options and Futures Markets. 4 hours.

History and institutional structure of options and futures markets. Uses of futures and options for arbitrage, speculation and hedging by financial and portfolio managers of domestic and multinational organizations. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 510.

FIN 520. Corporate Finance. 4 hours.

Advanced topics in corporate finance including capital structure, dividend policy, financial restructuring, bankruptcy, and leasing. Emphasis on recent developments in corporate finance and financial economics. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500.

FIN 530. Money and Banking. 4 hours.

The functions of money; monetary standards; development and operation of commercial banking and the Federal Reserve System. Theories of the supply and demand for money; effects of monetary changes on economic activity, interest rates, and income. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500.

FIN 531. Capital Markets. 4 hours.

Capital markets in the private economy. Flow of funds in financial markets and financial intermediaries. Pricing of securities. Short-term money markets and the Federal Reserve System. Market for long-term securities. Financial markets and the stability and progress of the economy. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500.

FIN 542. International Finance. 4 hours.

Financial management within an international context. International monetary system, exchange rates, foreign investments, working capital management, financing trade, taxation and earnings reports. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500.

FIN 544. Entrepreneurial and New Venture Financing. 4 hours.

The financing of new business. Estimating cash needs and then determining sources to finance them. This course is designed for those wanting to start their own business. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500.

FIN 551. Financial Decision Making I. 4 hours.

First foundation course for the study of modern financial economics. Two-period individual consumption and portfolio decisions under uncertainty and their implications for the valuation of securities. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

FIN 570. Quantitative Methods in Finance. 4 hours.

Statistical and optimization techniques for portfolio management, risk management, proprietary trading, securities regulation and market making. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

FIN 571. Empirical Issues in Finance. 4 hours.

The methodology used in analyses of market efficiency, asset pricing and capital allocation. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): FIN 500 and consent of the instructor.

FIN 573. Risk Management. 4 hours.

Introduction to risk management. Risk measurements and reserves; banking and insurance capital requirements, the BASEL accord, tail events, catastrophic event insurance, reinsurance. Financial contracts and hedging. Course Information: Same as IDS 573. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in IDS 570 and FIN 500.

FIN 594. Special Topics in Finance. 1-4 hours.

Develops the tools for evaluating and quantifying the value of fixed-income securities. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

FIN 596. Independent Study in Finance. 1-4 hours.

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. Must be arranged before the start of the semester. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of department head or instructor.

FIN 599. Ph.D. Thesis Research. 0-16 hours.

Independent research on topic approved for doctoral dissertation under supervision of faculty advisor. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

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